Home >> Summer Travel Study >> Italian: Italian Language and Culture
  • Summer Travel Study

    Italian:

    Italian Language and Culture

  • https://uclastudyabroad.wordpress.com/

    Summer Travel Study

    Italian:

    Italian Language and Culture

  • Summer Travel Study

    Italian:

    Italian Language and Culture

Overview

2015 Travel Study Scholarship winner Karla Estrada shares her experience on this program

Enjoy an idyllic summer on the Adriatic coast of Italy while studying language and culture in the capital of Italian seaside tourism and nightlife.  With its 15 km-long sandy beach, Rimini is one of the most famous summer resorts of Europe, served by an airport offering low cost flights to most capitals of the continent, and teeming with small outdoor restaurants. Take advantage of many opportunities to embark on excursions, visit other towns, and piece together a picture of the rich history of this cultural crossroad between Rome and the East. Program excursions include visits to Florence, Venice and Rome. Classes will be held in the air-conditioned, multimedia classrooms of a local school, where students will study conversational Italian, literature, art, and culture of one of the most fascinating countries in the world. 

Curriculum

Required Courses

Students will be required to take one of the following curriculum tracks:

Curriculum 1:  Italian 191, Italian 42C, Italian 8A

Italian 191: A Tale of Three Cities (Florence, Rome, Venice) (4 units)

This course will concentrate on the artists, architects, history, and stories of these three important Italian cities. Readings will provide historical background and include short stories by famous Italian authors that capture the essence of these fascinating cities. Lectures will examine the art and architecture of these cities and prepare students for eventual site visits to Rome, Italy’s capital, Florence, the birthplace of the Renaissance, and Venice, the city of canals and 118 islands.  

Italian 191 counts toward the College graduation requirement of 60 upper-division units.

Italian 42C: Food and Culture in Emilia Romagna (taught in English) (4 units)

This course will familiarize students with modern and contemporary Italy and Italian culture through works about food and eating.  Course content will span the origins of traditional Italian cuisine through the present slow food movement in Italy.  In particular, we will study the relationship between eating and various forms of identity: familial identity, ethnic identity, and social class. In particular, we will focus on how these forms of identity have evolved in the region of Emilia Romagna (the home of the famous parmesan cheese, parmigiano reggiano, and prosciutto di Parma), and study the local slow food movement.  There will be a strong experiential component introducing the cuisine in Rimini, which will include a cooking demonstration of the regional piada, and a trip to a local farm to study the slow food movement in action.

Italian 42C can be applied toward the Literary & Cultural Analysis UCLA GE requirement.

Italian 8A: Italian Conversation (2 units)

This course is for students with little or no Italian language experience.  The course will focus on basic communication skills that include learning greetings, asking and answering questions, how read signs, how to give personal information when checking into hotels or making reservations, how to order in a restaurant and other survival skills for visiting Italy.

 

Curriculum 2: Italian 191, Italian 42C, Italian 8C

Italian 191: A Tale of Three Cities (Florence, Rome, Venice) (4 units)

This course will concentrate on the artists, architects, history, and stories of these three important Italian cities. Readings will provide historical background and include short stories by famous Italian authors that capture the essence of these fascinating cities. Lectures will exam the art and architecture of these cities and prepare students for eventual site visits to Rome, Italy’s capital, Florence, the birthplace of the Renaissance, and Venice, the city of canals and 118 islands.

Italian 191 counts toward the College graduation requirement of 60 upper-division units.

Italian 42C: Food and Culture in Emilia Romagna (taught in English) (4 units)

This course will familiarize students with modern and contemporary Italy and Italian culture through works about food and eating.  Course content will span the origins of traditional Italian cuisine through the present slow food movement in Italy.  In particular, we will study the relationship between eating and various forms of identity: familial identity, ethnic identity, and social class. In particular, we will focus on how these forms of identity have evolved in the region of Emilia Romagna (the home of the famous parmesan cheese, parmigiano reggiano, and prosciutto di Parma), and study the local slow food movement.  There will be a strong experiential component introducing the cuisine in Rimini, which will include a cooking demonstration of the regional piada, and a trip to a local farm to study the slow food movement in action.

Italian 42C can be applied toward the Literary & Cultural Analysis UCLA GE requirement.

Italian 8C: Italian Conversation (2 units)

This course is for students with some Italian language background. Most attention will be paid to intermediate language skills and communication goals. These include talking about likes and dislikes, speaking in the past tense, discussing methods of transportation, health conditions, describing geographical features and landscapes and talking about contemporary Italian life and society. 

Optional Course

Italian 199: Directed Research (requires instructor consent)

Students also have the option of enrolling in an optional 199 course, allowing them to do an additional assignment on a topic related to the travel study program.  Instructor consent is required to register, so be sure to obtain your instructor's approval on the subject and format. There is an additional fee for this optional course.

Schedule

All schedules, itineraries, and group activities are subject to change at the discretion of the instructor.

Classes generally do not meet on Saturdays and Sundays.

Textbooks

You are responsible for purchasing your own textbooks. We strongly suggest you read as much of the text material as possible before you depart. Textbook information will be available at a later date.

Budget and Financial Aid

Program Costs

Budget UC Undergrads UC Grad Students Visiting Students
Program Fee
Textbooks (estimate) 150 150 150
Airfare (estimate) 1700 1700 1700
Meals (estimate) 1200 1200 1200
Spending Money (estimate) 500 500 500

Program fee includes registration and course fees, accommodations, some meals, program excursions and health insurance.

Airfare, textbooks, optional courses, other meals and optional excursions are additional.

Fees are subject to change by action of the UC Regents.

Document Fee

Non-UCLA students will be charged a $50 Document Fee. This is a one-time document fee which covers fees for first-class mailing of official transcripts, diploma and much more. Please visit the Registrar's Office Website for more information. Matriculated UCLA Students: Please visit the Registrar's Office Website for document fee information.

IEI Fee

All undergraduate students will be charged a $61 IEI fee per summer. The IEI (Instructional Enhancement Initiative) fee is a course materials fee that is charged in order to support the use of technology in undergraduate education at UCLA. For more information please click here.

Budgeting

We recommend that you budget accordingly to cover optional sightseeing, laundry, internet cafes, emergencies, etc.  How much to budget depends on your travel, entertainment and souvenir choices. It is always best to overestimate your spending. Take the time to research the cost of living in your destination and the activities you want to participate in while abroad.

Purchasing Airfare

We typically advise students to wait until late March to purchase airplane tickets for summer programs.

Financial Aid

Financial aid for Travel Study programs is available to qualified UCLA students. All other students should inquire about financial aid at their home institution. For details about the financial aid application process, please visit the Financial Aid section of this web site.

On Location

Accommodations

Students will reside in a centrally-located hotel in Rimini.

UCLA Summer Sessions reserves the right to change housing locations. Should this be necessary, we will arrange comparable accommodations elsewhere.

Meals

Daily breakfast will be provided at the hotel.

If you have strict dietary requirements, this program may not be able to accommodate your needs. Please let us know when you apply for this program if you have special dietary needs as well as any physical or medical conditions. We will advise you accordingly.

Excursions

This program includes several excursions as part of its curriculum.  In Rome we will visit St. Peter’s Basilica, the Coliseum, and take a walking tour to see Rome’s most famous piazzas and fountains.  In Florence we will visit the Duomo and the famous Baptistry doors designed by Ghiberti, and then visit the political center of the Florentine Renaissance, the Piazza della Signoria.  Students will be able to visit the Uffizi to see Botticelli’s Birth of Venus.  In Venice, in addition to visiting St. Mark’s Square, the Bridge of Sighs and the Doge’s Palace, we will explore some of the back streets less commonly seen by tourists passing through.

 

Dates

June 25th - July 22nd, 2017

Location

Rimini

Faculty

Program Fee

UC Undergrads:
UC Grad Students:
Visiting Students:
Fees are subject to change by action of the UC Regents.